Archive | photography RSS feed for this section

drakes bay oyster farm

“He was a bold man that first ate an oyster.” -Jonathan Swift

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (34)

When you drive up to Marin County, there’s a good chance you’ll spot signs for Save Our Drakes Bay Oyster Farm. The signs are visible throughout Napa and Sonoma as well. And they become even more visible as you get closer to Point Reyes. Hand-painted with a simple message, they reflect a community that cares. A historic farm, owned by a third-generation ranching family, Drakes “provides local jobs and a sustainable food product that supports local businesses.”

Fog-filled skies, cold weather along the marsh and bay, an afternoon in pictures.

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (5)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (13)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (17)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (3)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (19)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (25)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (16)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (27)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (28)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (29)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (1)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (35)

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (36)

yumivore drakes oyster

yumivore drakes bay oyster farm (44)

“As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.” -Ernest Hemingway

Drakes Bay is a great spot for a picnic with friends to enjoy delectable fresh oysters. The Oyster Shack will shuck the oysters for you, or give you a quick tutorial so you can give it a try on your own. For more about the plight of Drakes Bay, visit:

Alliance for Local Sustainable Agriculture
Appeals court deals blow to Drakes Bay Oyster Co.
Drakes Bay Oyster Company Will Be Forced To Close [Update: Maybe Not]

Enjoy more yum, would love to see you on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yumivores
And leave a note, I appreciate them all!

Comments { 2 }

along the turquoise trail

yumivore turquoise trail new mexico (7)

Flying in to Albuquerque, New Mexico from there I took the Turquoise Trail to reach Santa Fe and spent a night at a Bed and Breakfast on a ranch along the way. A National Scenic Byway, Highway 14 starts to get interesting once you reach Madrid. A small old mining town that’s full of character, it’s a quaint stop. It’s also full of dust, but bright colors splashed everywhere from stores to mailboxes makes up for it. The Mine Shaft Tavern is a must-stop to enjoy a local beer and catch Harley riders. It also happens to be a historic saloon, and a gem of a spot. The locals quickly pointed out it’s pronounced Maad-rid unlike the city in Spain. There’s plenty of art studios, galleries, vintage shops and cowboy boots to find along the main street. Venturing on to Cerrillos, you’ll feel as though you ventured back in time. It’s a quintessential old American Western town. A number of films have been made in the area, it captures the heart of the West. Though you won’t find turquoise along the way, one of the best things about sleeping in one of the resorts or ranches along the trail is that you will find a multitude of stars at night. Serene and peaceful is the best way to describe my overnight stay. A short trip, with still more to explore, I hope to venture back.

yumivore turquoise trail new mexico (21)

yumivore turquoise trail new mexico (24)

yumivore turquoise trail new mexico (6)

yumivore turquoise trail new mexico (5)

yumivore turquoise trail new mexico (1)

yumivore turquoise trail new mexico (27)

For more posts on New Mexico, have a taste of Chimayó Chiles.

Enjoy more yum, would love to see you on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yumivores
And leave a note, I appreciate them all!

Comments { 0 }

wise sons deli

photos du jour: a taste of Wise Sons Deli

yumivore wise sons deli (2)

yumivore wise sons deli (17)

yumivore wise sons deli (10)

yumivore wise sons deli (24)

yumivore wise sons deli (27)

yumivore wise sons deli (4)

yumivore wise sons deli (26)

yumivore wise sons deli (5)

yumivore wise sons deli (19)

yumivore wise sons deli

yumivore wise sons deli (3)

yumivore wise sons deli (28)

yumivore wise sons deli (25)

yumivore wise sons deli (12)

yumivore wise sons deli (8)

yumivore wise sons deli (15)

yumivore wise sons deli (18)

Wise Sons Jewish Delicatessen on 24th Street in the Mission, San Francisco
Wise Sons Deli
Getting Wise: How a community helped build a deli

Enjoy more yum, would love to see you on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yumivores
And leave a note, I appreciate them all!

Comments { 4 }

across the bridge, to brooklyn

98150029

98150023

16160009

87320004

98530011

98150018

My memory of Brighton Beach of the time that’s captured here is faint at this point. I vaguely can conjure up images of my mother’s friends who lived in Brighton, and my trips across the Brooklyn Bridge to get there. Though I was often adverse to many foods at this stage, it’s not at all odd to me now that what I remember most from my visits to Brooklyn is in fact the food.

I recall my mother’s passion for the delicacies from her motherland and her quest to find them; Little Odessa was often the place to oblige her palate. Hot golden-colored pirozhki pop in my mind. We enjoyed these treats with either savory or sweet fillings. Made from a yeast dough, the buns would be shallow-fried and turn out golden in color, a bit oily to the touch and taste, it would be stuffed with chopped meat and mixed with sautéed onions. Mashed potatoes stuffed inside was another option and sometimes I’d be surprised to find sautéed mushrooms hiding within as well. A sweet option that was never truly sweet but memorable would be pirozhki stuffed with sour cherries. The cherries I remember would make me pucker. A few pirozhki, usually the meat-filled ones, would be wrapped up in parchment paper and placed in a brown paper bag for the ride home. Bialys fresh from a bakery, likely nearby, would also find themselves stuffed into a paper bag, and one would always make its way into my hand. Today I would grab these rolls if I could get them. Bialys are a bit like a pizza crust-like bread with a deep center filled with diced onions, and usually poppy seeds would be sprinkled inside as well. Other delicacies to discover would be pickles, and most certainly pickled herring, along with a smorgasbord of other fish such as smoked sturgeon, lox, trout – and only the finest quality would do. It sounded to me like arguing, but my mother would fervently speak to the shopkeepers or folks behind the counter in Russian or Yiddish; I would pick up bits here or there of the conversation as she searched for the finest tidbits to taste.

Eventually settling in for meal at a friend’s home we’d find a plate of varenykis, dumplings, sometimes also called pierogi. These too would be stuffed with a variety of combinations, spinach and cheese, potatoes and onions, or a meat filling similar to the pirozhki. Finely chopped and sautéed onions would be served on top if filed with meat, a large dollop of sour cream if it was potato pierogi. Sour cream seemed to find it’s way atop what seemed most dishes, including my favorite, blinztes, very similar to a crêpe and filled with farmers cheese or pot cheese. Likely from my memories I would have declined eating anything more at this point, and with the conversation in dedicated Russian, I often could escape from the table without protest and seek comfort in a book, a friend who usually was in tote wherever I would travel. Books continue to be my faithful friends today, though I could never have imagined engaging in such an affair with food.

In addition to the photo of me reading, you can catch a glimpse of me walking along Brighton Beach Avenue with my mother. I’m helping her carry bags filled with delicacies (perhaps even produce) that we had picked up at the markets and bakeries. The pictures were taken by photographer Carol Kitman and shared with permission.

Enjoy more yum, would love to see you on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yumivores
And leave a note, I appreciate them all!

Comments { 6 }

dans le jardin

photos du jour | dans le jardin
in the garden

yumivore photos du jour ladybugs (10)

yumivore photos du jour ladybugs (5)

yumivore ladybugs

yumivore photos du jour ladybugs (6)

yumivore photos du jour ladybugs (7)

yumivore photos du jour ladybugs (8)

yumivore photos du jour ladybugs (9)

Enjoy more yum, would love to see you on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yumivores
And leave a note, I appreciate them all!

Comments { 2 }

the french laundry garden

photos du jour |
Early spring, a mildly hazy but wonderfully warm day. Following an impromptu visit to the renowned French Laundry for lunch, a romp through the restaurant’s edible garden. Sit back and savor the moment.

yumivore french laundry garden (30)

yumivore french laundry garden (6)

yumivore french laundry garden (7)

yumivore french laundry garden (25)

yumivore french laundry garden (9)

yumivore french laundry garden (31)

yumivore french laundry garden (26)

yumivore french laundry garden (13)

yumivore french laundry garden (11)

yumivore french laundry garden (14)

yumivore french laundry garden (15)

yumivore french laundry garden

yumivore french laundry garden (12)

yumivore french laundry garden (17)

yumivore french laundry garden (18)

yumivore french laundry garden (3)

yumivore french laundry garden (19)

yumivore french laundry garden (29)

yumivore french laundry garden (22)

yumivore french laundry garden (24)

yumivore french laundry garden (2)

For more pictures from that exquisite visit, enjoy photos and a taste: Lunch at The French Laundry.

Enjoy more yum, would love to see you on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yumivores
And leave a note, I appreciate them all!

Comments { 6 }

a mad men cocktail party

yumivoremadmen (4)

Grab a glass and a plate, the menu for this cocktail party is inspired by the many seasons and episodes of Mad Men. Mushroom Canapés are the quintessential cocktail party appetizer of the 1960s. Savory bites on Melba toasts are a perfect and easy hors d’oeuvre. Blinis topped with caviar or smoked salmon adds a little elegance to the party. A plate of crudité is perfect for dipping in and enjoying Bagna Càuda. Devoured out of the oven, Gambas au Beurre d’Escargot adds a little intrigue to the evening. The recipes are below; go ahead and have a taste.

yumivorecanapes (4)

yumivorecanapes (6)

yumivorecanapes (5)

yumivoremadmen (12)

yumivoremadmen (10)

yumivoremadmen (6)

yumivoremadmen (8)

yumivoremadmen (1)

yumivoremadmen (3)

yumivoremadmen

For the Vodka Gimlet, mix vodka with simple syrup and a squeeze of lime. Be sure your glass and the vodka is ice cold. For more cocktail party inspiration and recipes along with tales from Mad Men peruse through The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook: Inside the Kitchens, Bars, and Restaurants of Mad Men by Judy Gelman and Peter Zheutlin. Cheers to a new season of Mad Men, more cocktails and happy eating!

recipes on yumivore
Mushroom Canapés
Buckwheat Blini
Bagna Càuda
Gambas au Beurre d’Escargot

Enjoy more yum, would love to see you on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yumivores
And leave a note, I appreciate them all!

Comments { 4 }

lunch at the french laundry

yumivorefrenchlaundry (1)

I’m reveling in bliss for having eaten a symphony of stars and finally having taken a bite out of the one perhaps most challenging to reach in the constellation. The French Laundry is lauded with international accolades including landing on many Best and Top Restaurants lists, is a James Beard Foundation recipient, and has garnered three Michelin Stars, defined as a restaurant reflecting “exceptional cuisine and worthy of a special journey”. There wasn’t a special occasion on the calendar to celebrate that sent me on a long drive up to Yountville in Napa Valley. Just an impromptu chance for my taste buds to celebrate, and a ‘carpe diem’ opportunity not to miss. For a gastronome, arriving at The French Laundry is like reaching the pinnacle of a trip. But I’m fortunate to say that the journey does not end here, there is far more cuisine, from the simple to the exotic, to go on to explore. For someone with a deep interest in gastronomy and passionate about the intersection of food, history, and culture, indulging in haute cuisine now and again is gratifying. The experience doesn’t transcend eating a meal where the recipes for the dishes have been passed on from generation to generation for example, nor does it even surpass eating something simple yet sublime. But venturing into one of the distinguished establishments of the Les Grandes Tables du Monde is an adventure and ultimately an experience. For a moment (or perhaps several hours) I was fortunate to experience The French Laundry and step into the world of world-renowned Chef Thomas Keller.

Photos du Jour | Step inside, sit back, sip some champagne and wine, and enjoy a parade of dishes from the kitchen – a tasting menu and feast for the eyes, then a taste of the kitchen itself.

yumivorefrenchlaundry (59)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (51)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (54)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (4)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (7)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (6)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (9)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (10)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (11)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (12)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (16)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (17)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (20)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (19)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (22)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (21)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (25)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (26)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (61)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (15)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (27)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (41)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (28)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (30)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (29)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (33)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (31)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (34)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (35)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (36)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (38)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (37)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (3)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (44)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (42)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (39)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (40)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (64)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (60)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (63)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (57)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (49)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (45)

yumivorefrenchlaundry (58)

So often art on a plate is an intimate experience relished for only a few moments, then left to memory. In the food world, there’s currently a debate whether diners should or should not take pictures of their food, and some restauranteurs and chefs feel camera-enabled smartphones (such as the iPhone) is intruding on the dining experience. This sentiment may also be felt by other guests at the table or guests at nearby tables. Some chefs are also concerned the quality of the pictures being snapped may misrepresent the dishes that are being served. Being aware of the debate, prior to taking these photos, I did out of courtesy ask the staff if it was acceptable to take pictures, and they in fact encouraged it.

While I would be delighted to know the images are enticing and whet your appetite, documenting my dishes is foremost a way for me to capture a moment I hope to look back on. Relevant to yumivore, to quote Thomas Keller: “I think that you’ve got to make something that pleases you and hope that other people feel the same way.” So often these carefully crafted plates are lost after being devoured, and all that remains are just a few memories of the experience. Perhaps this is by design and the way fine dining is meant to be. Documenting dishes can serve though as not only a way to capture a personal experience but also a way to reflect on what we as a society are currently eating or indulging in, and with a changing landscape, our foods may very well be quite different in the years ahead. So too our philosophy may change (or even mine) regarding taking pictures while dining.

There are many more interesting debates taking place in the food world today, some hot topics include sustainability, the “tyranny” of the tasting menu, or even fine dining making a comeback. Some of these topics are very relevant to Chef Keller. There’s too much fodder to cover in one sitting but it all makes great food for thought. I’ll end with a thought from the chef:

“When you acknowledge, as you must, that there is no such thing as perfect food, only the idea of it, then the real purpose of striving toward perfection becomes clear: to make people happy, that is what cooking is all about.” -Chef Thomas Keller

Enjoy more yum, would love to see you on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yumivores
And leave a note, I appreciate them all!

Comments { 10 }